• How to Prepare Your Skin for the Hot, Humid Summer

    June 19th, 2015



    Once the sun comes out, everyone starts to show a little more skin to keep themselves cool. Since more of your skin will be exposed and on display, it’s important to efficiently prep your skin for the summer season. Here are a few tips to get a glowing complexion and smooth body for summer.

    Exfoliate off that dead skin from spring. For a smoother shave, exfoliate your legs and body with a gentle product, such as Shinso Glow, and a washcloth or loofah. After exfoliating, follow up with a rich moisturizer.

    Apply sunscreen every day. There’s nothing worse than getting a sunburn. It’s not only an eyesore and a literal pain, but sunburns are an indication of damage to your skin and can lead to skin cancer. Even on days that aren’t 100% sunny, it’s still crucial to apply SPF on your face and body. If you are forgetful, opt for a daily moisturizer or foundation with SPF built in.

    Drink enough water. Your skin will be parched from the heat, sun and all of summer’s fun activities, so make sure you stay hydrated. Drinking enough water isn’t just good for your health, it also keeps your skin looking plump and full.

     

  • Why You Should Choose a Natural Sunscreen

    June 18th, 2015



    It’s a no-brainer that sunscreen is an extremely important part of everyone’s daily skincare routine, but what specific types of sunscreen should you be using? Natural sunscreens have become more widely produced and available at affordable prices, making this the clear choice. Below are a few reasons why you should choose a natural sunscreen.

    They don’t contain harmful toxins. Some sunscreens contain ingredients such as retinyl palmitate and retinyl acetate (derivatives of Vitamin A that could speed up the development of skin tumors and lesions) or ozybenzone (could disrupt hormones by penetrating the skin and entering the bloodstream).  Instead, look for mineral-based ingredients that won’t penetrate the skin, like zinc or titanium oxide.

    Natural sunscreens often are unscented. Fragrances in sunscreens are often petroleum-based and can lead to organ toxicity and allergies. People with sensitive skin or skin that burns/breaks out easily should avoid anything with fragrances as well.

    You’re helping the environment. Sunscreens that don’t contain these harmful toxins won’t get released into the environment. Any mineral that is harmful to humans to put on their skin also is generally harmful to wildlife and their ecosystems. You could also take into consideration that sunscreens with natural ingredients are produced in a more eco-friendly way as well, but this isn’t proven yet.

  • Is Your Skin Care Regimen Right For Your Skin Type?

    June 10th, 2015



    While walking by the skincare aisle in a drugstore or department store, you’ll notice a variety of products created for different skin types. Generally these fall into one of the following categories: normal, oily, dry, combination or sensitive. It may sound obvious to say that these products are created and formulated specifically for those with certain skin problems, but you’d be surprised at home many women are using products for the wrong skin type.

    How do you find out which type of skin you have? 

    People with normal skin have very few imperfections, no severe sensitivity to products or the seasons, barely visible pores and a radiant complexion.

    People with oily skin have enlarged pores, a shiny, thick complexion and blackheads, pimples or other blemishes.

    People with dry skin have barely-noticeable pores, a dull and rough complexion, a few red patches, less elasticity and fine lines.

    People with combination skin can be dry or normal in some areas, but then really oily in others (usually the T-zone). Some characteristics of this include overly dilated pores, blackheads and shiny skin.

    People with sensitive skin often notice redness, itching, burning and dryness on their face.

     

    What regimen should I follow if my skin is…

    Normal? If you’re blessed with normal skin, stick to the basics of skincare: washing with a gentle cleanser, exfoliating to remove dead skin, and moisturizing daily.

    Oily? Oily skin can get worse based on the weather and stress, so try to stay happy and healthy to avoid those triggers. Be sure to wash your skin no more than twice a day (to prevent over-washing) with a gentle cleanser. Products labeled “noncomedogenic” work well for oily skin types, as they don’t clog pores.

    Dry? Dry skin types should take shorter showers to prevent drying out their skin. They need to focus on applying rich moisturizers immediately after showering to absorb into the skin. Ointments and creams have a thicker consistency that work better to penetrate dry skin.

    Combination? With combination skin, you’ll need to use different products on the different areas of your face. Follow the directions above for the oily and dry areas as needed.

    Sensitive-? If you have sensitive skin, you should use products without fragrance. Sticking to all-natural products helps as well, since they don’t contain the typical irritants like parabens. Exfoliate only once or twice a week since anything more can be too harsh on the skin.

  • Coffee Vs. Japanese Green Tea: Which is Better For Your Skin?

    June 9th, 2015



    The morning debate between coffee and green tea is something I often face once I’ve arrived at work. Do I go for the zen of green tea or opt for one of the java flavors? While both are super tasty, contain caffeine, and can help you hit your 8 glasses of water a day quota, there are a few differences. Today we’re looking at which is better for your skin- green tea or coffee?

    Coffee

    • One study showed that coffee bean extracts can be responsible for skin cell energy preservation due to its free-radical properties.
    • Another study found that caffeine inhibits the DNA damage response, thus protecting skin against the adverse effects of UVB. The inhibition of DNA damage response may offer a therapeutic option for non-melanoma skin cancer.
    • When coffee promotes blood circulation, it leads to healthy and energized skin, effectively reducing the swelling of tissues and depuffing areas of the skin.

    Japanese Green Tea

    • Green tea is packed with powerful antioxidants called catechins, which have been shown to potentially inhibit the growth of some cancers, including skin cancer. These antioxidants an reduce the formation of free radicals in the body, protecting cells and molecules from damage. These free radicals are known to play a role in aging and all sorts of diseases.
    • Since green tea has around 1/3 the amount of caffeine as coffee, it has been linked to stress relief. This reduction in stress could help clear up any stress-related skin issues you may have, such as redness or acne.
    • Studies have shown that topical green tea formulations reduce sun damage. Green tea appears to exert sun damage protection by quenching free radicals and reducing inflammation rather than by blocking UV rays. Therefore, green tea may enhance sun protection when used in addition to a sunscreen.
    • Considering their well-documented antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, topical green tea polyphenols are likely to slow down the development of some signs of aging.

    The winner? Japanese Green Tea!